Category Archives: Media

‘Deep Blue’ for Science Week 2020

What an exciting opportunity we have this year with Science Week.  The theme for the yearly program is dedicated to something Ocean Life Education is extremely passionate about.

Deep Blue: innovations for the future of our oceans

In case you’re wondering what exactly that means, don’t be shy – read on.

Science Week is celebrated throughout Australia annually, this year falling upon the 15 – 23 August.  It is a way to embrace science and technology, whether you are a school student, a builder or a scientist – all are invited to jump in and get involved by taking part in over 1000 scientific events held nationally. Science Week is for everyone, and each of the activities are designed to address and excite all ages. But what is the end goal for such programs and interactive activities?

Here at Ocean Life Education, we endeavour to enhance and spark interest in scientific pursuits for the future.

Science week has delivered a powerful format this year and we are looking forward to joining the celebration by offering a program discussing advancing innovations such as aquaculture and clean energy.

The Australian Science Teachers Association has a great resource book of ideas.

Here’s a look at what this year’s theme will be covering …

Aquaculture is the controlled process of cultivating aquatic organisms, especially for human consumption. With billions of mouths to feed in our ever-populating world, the earth’s wild fish and marine life, cannot possibly sustain us, therefore it’s vital to research viable aquaculture systems.

Water is a very powerful element.  Investigating how we can harness the power of our oceans to generate electricity is a vital step to attaining clean energy as a solution for reducing our impact on climate change and eliminate carbon pollution. Although the use of water to generate electricity is not new; we are now looking to the power of seawater to do the same.

What we need is brilliant young minds to come up with engineering solutions to make this possible and affordable. Will that be you?

Get in touch

info@oceanlifeeducation.com.au

07 5443 8545

Ocean to Outback – Sights, Sounds and Smells of the Sea Go Bush

Considering they’re very basic creatures, sea stars have some pretty amazing abilities (like regrowing their own leg if they lose one!) but they don’t normally travel hundreds of kilometres inland… until now.

With a little assistance from Ocean Life Education, our Blue Linckia’s, along with the rest of our marine life menagerie, have temporarily migrated away from the coast to help students who rarely get to see the sea understand more about the challenges these animals face.

In a road trip lasting 3 days and covering close to 500 kilometres, Ocean Life Education is making sure children in Blackbutt, Nanango and Kingaroy don’t miss out on the chance to touch and learn about our wonderful animal ambassadors.

The Ocean to Outback initiative is supported by the State Government through its Advance Queensland Engaging Science Grant.

Why go to such extreme lengths to facilitate these encounters?  Oceans cover almost three quarters of our planet and produce more than half of the oxygen on earth while absorbing harmful carbon dioxide.

Ocean currents also move such a large body water between the equator and poles, they help to regulate the global climate which impacts all of us – even those that live well beyond the shoreline.  Keeping the oceans healthy is in everyone’s best interest.

But travelling with a crew of sea stars, sea cucumbers, sea urchins, hermit crabs and a shark is not without its challenges as water quality and oxygen levels are vital to their survival, especially in the hostile bush environment.

One thousand litres of salt water have been transported along with the animals to ensure they are stress free on their little adventure.

But all the planning, all the logistics have been worth it just to see the excitement on the faces of a whole new batch of ocean lovers, who may rarely hear the waves crash or smell the salt in the air but know the importance of caring about the underwater world – even this far from the coast.

Ocean Life Education receives Engaging Science Grant

Moggill State School students touching sea urchin during ocean life education program

Students at Moggill State School during Ocean Life Education program

We are excited to be a recipient of the Advance Queensland Engaging Science Grant from the Queensland Government.

The Engaging Science Grants support science engagement and communication projects, events and activities that increase the reach and impact of science in Queensland.

At Ocean Life Education, we combine science and entertainment to deliver our interactive marine education programs using live marine animals with the aim of inspiring students to appreciate and take responsibility for the marine ecosystem.

“We are honoured to be recognised as a business that is increasing engagement and participation of the community in science-based activities.” Richard Coward.

 

We’ll be using the grant to bring our “Ocean to Outback” program to rural communities in the Western Downs region, to provide students with a greater understanding of the oceans’ marine creatures and ecosystem and the current challenges facing the marine environment.

We can’t wait to get on the road and meet you, and we look forward to bringing the sea to you!

Read the official Media Release from the Minister Leeanne Enoch MP

Read more about the Engaging Science Grants

OceanZen turns plastic waste into bikinis

oceanzen bikini steph

Have you met Steph? She’s one of our Ocean Life Education presenters and probably visited your centre recently to deliver our Ocean Discovery or vacation care programs. There’s more to this girl than just her passion for inspiring children to love the ocean, she’s also created her own sustainable swimwear label, OceanZen Bikini.

Steph started her bikini label while studying an environmental science degree. She knew she wanted to do something unique coupled with her passion for ocean conservation.

Sheph has now recreated the OceanZen bikini and relaunched her sustainable line made from recycled plastic bottles and discarded fishing net fibres taken from the ocean!

The plastics are sourced direct from the ocean and then sent to a factory to be cleaned, finely chopped and processed into a fine yarn that is 100 per cent regenerated. It is then turned into a high quality Italian lycra for swimwear.

Steph says “OceanZen Bikini is saving the ocean one bikini at a time!”

“It’s not just about awesome, functional, stylish and eye catching bikinis with OceanZen. It’s also about an environmentally conscious brand and our dream combing both passions; marine conversation and swimwear together.”

OceanZen also raises awareness with marine conservation projects and environmental updates via its social media.

“The ocean is our last true wilderness that we have left to explore and it needs to be protected,” says Steph.

oceanzen swimming

“Research shows that only 1 in 5 plastic bottles actually get recycled after single use and every second approximately 1,500 plastic bottles end up either in the ocean or in waste landfills. These numbers are rising. No wonder our oceans are polluted, no wonder our beautiful marine animals are suffering!”

Steph held a launch party on the Sunshine Coast this weekend and will debut her collection at the upcoming Sunshine Coast Fashion Festival in October.

We love what Steph has achieved, her motivation to get out there and ‘do something’ is inspiring. Imagine what we can achieve if we all combine our individual passions with a love for our oceans and the Planet.