Tag Archives: Marine Habitats

Celebrating Coastcare Week 2021

Rockpools

Coastcarers are marine legends. They dedicate their time and energy to protecting our beautiful coastline. Many of us will visit Queensland’s beaches over the Summer holidays. You can do your bit to celebrate Coastcare Week 2021 this summer holiday by combining your trip with a mini beach clean or simply by making little changes to your day that will make a big difference. Remember, tiny ripples make big waves!!

What is Coastcare and Coastcare Week?

Coastcare are volunteer groups made up of Aussies who want to play a part in protecting our incredible coastal and marine enviroments. They are just like you and me, one person, joined together to make a significant force of 500 groups accross Australia. 500 groups that make a big difference through long-term, practical solutions for environmental issues in their local area.

Coastcare week is an annual campaign celebrating these community groups around Australia.

Coastcare ProjectsBeach Clean

Coastcarers get active, tackling problems such as dune protection, revegetation of native coastal environments, protection of endangered coastal species habitats, prevention of storm water pollution, weed and non-native plant removal, control of human access to sensitive and vulnerable areas and education programs.

Get Involved – Join Coastcare

To join a group, check out the Coastcare website

Get Involved – Just Do Your Bit!

You don’t have to join a group to make a difference. Here are our top tips on how to protect Queensland’s beaches this holiday as part of your day out.

TOP TIPS…

Enjoy exploring the rockpools!

Learning all about the marine environment will inspire you to want to protect it and all that lives there.

Take a bag with you

Collect rubbish and plastic marine debris as you walk. Every piece of plastic removed from the marine environment can save an animal’s life and reduce microplastics in the ocean.

Have a competition to see who’s collected the most rubbish

It’s disappointing that the beaches are littered but there’s no harm in making cleaning them fun!

Keep to walking tracks

This protects the vegetation that provides habitat for birds and animals. It also prevents erosion.

Keep your dog on a lead

Especially on dunes with vulnerable vegetation.

Look out for birds and animals

Try not to disturb them and make sure your dog leaves them in peace too!

Avoid and reduce plastics

Plastic has a habit of blowing around. If you don’t use it or take it to the beach, it can’t go astray and harm marine animals.

Have fun and feel good!

Enjoying the beach will make you feel good…and caring for it along the way will make you feel even better.

Here’s a great guide to our local rockpools…

Sunshine Coast Rockpool Identification Guide

More useful info…

How to Get Involved in a Beachclean

Xmas Beach Activities

 

Ocean Habitats

Oceans support an immense diversity of life and ecosystems. From warm tropical waters of the Caribbean to the freezing polar regions (and from zooplankton to blue whales!) a staggering range of animals, plants and other life forms call the ocean their home. These ocean, or marine habitats, provide everything needed for survival – food, shelter, water and oxygen.

Types of Marine Habitat

Marine habitats are divided into two main zones – coastal habitats and open ocean habitats. Within these habitats there are numerous sub habitats.

Coastal Habitats

Coastal HabitatsThe coastal habitat is the region from the shoreline out to the continental shelf. Most marine creatures live in coastal habitat, although it only makes up seven percent of the ocean. Coastal habitats include intertidal zones (constantly exposed and covered by the ocean’s tides), rocky shore, mangrove, mudflats, estuaries, kelp forest, sea grass, sandy shores/beach and coral reefs

 

Open Ocean Habitats

Open Ocean HabitatsOpen Ocean Habitats are found beyond the continental shelf, this is the deep ocean. Open ocean habitats are divided into layers which include surface waters, the deep sea, and the ocean floor. It is estimated that about 10 percent of marine species live in the open ocean. They tend to be the largest and fastest, such as whales and sharks, or fish that swim in schools. Tiny marine life, such as plankton, also inhabit this zone.

 

Queensland’s Marine Habitats

Habitats ReefQueensland’s stunning coastline comprises a wide range of marine habitats. These include sandy and rocky shores, mangrove, and coral reef; with the largest reef of all, The Great Barrier Reef, located just off Queensland’s coast.

For more information on Queensland’s marine habitats, check out Ocean Life Education’s NEW Habitats video presented by our owner and Senior Marine Biologist, Richard Coward. Habitats video

For Habitats themed incursions, go to our Primary programs & resources